Information Technology Track

The following requirements need to be satisfied to earn the program certificate: core course, two technology courses, two societal courses, one breadth course, one-semester independent research project, present project/thesis to the program students and faculty at an annual symposium.

Please check the course offerings by term here.

Core Course

EGR/HIS/SOC 277 -Technology and Society 

Technology Courses (2 courses required):

COS 109/EGR 109 – Computers in Our World
COS/EGR 126 – General Computer Science (may be taken instead of COS 109)
COS 432 – Information Security
COS 445 – Networks, Economics and Computing
COS 455/MOL 455 – Introduction to Genomics and Computational Molecular Biology
COS 597D – Advanced Topics in Computer Science – Information Privacy Technologies (Undergraduates need permission from the instructor to register for this graduate course and completion of the form Permission to Enroll.)

ELE 201 – Introduction to Signals and Systems (may be taken instead of ELE 222)
ELE 222a/b/EGR 222a/b – The Computing Age
ELE 381/COS 381 – Networks: Friends, Money, and Bytes
ELE 386/EGR 386 – Cyber Security
ELE 391/EGR 391 – The Wireless Revolution: Telecommunications for the 21st Century
ELE 580/COS 580 – Advanced Topics in Computer Engineering: Trustworthy Computing
FRS 125 – Friending, Following and Finding
ORF 401 – Electronic Commerce
ORF 411 – Operations and Information Engineering

Societal Courses (2 courses required):

COS/EGR 448* – Innovating Across Technology, Business, & Markets
COS 495/ART 495 – Special Topics in Computer Science – Modeling the Past – Technologies and Excavations in Polis, Cyprus
COS 586/WWS 586F* – Topics in STEP: Information Technology and Public Policy
FRS 101* – Facebook: The Social Impact of Social Networks (one time course – Fall 2012)
FRS 163 – Technology and Policy
PSY 214 – Human Identity in the Age of Neuroscience and Information Technology
PSY 322/ORF 322 – Human Machine Interaction
SOC 204 – Social Networks
SOC 214 – Creativity, Innovation, and Society
SOC 344 – Communications, Culture, and Society
SOC 357* – Sociology of Technology
SOC 409*/COS 409 – Critical Approaches to Human Computer Interaction
WWS 334/SOC 313 – Media and Public Policy (formerly WWS 309)
WWS 351/SOC 353/COS 351 – Information Technology and Public Policy (formerly WWS 451)
WWS 571B/NES 584 – Topics in Development – New Media & Social Movements: New Tools for an Old Game (Undergraduates need permission from the instructor to register for this graduate course and completion of the form Permission to Enroll.)

Breadth Course (1 course required):

In addition to the technology and society courses, each student is required to take one course that combines technology and society in an area outside of IT. For engineering/science students this should be based in the societal disciplines, and for humanities and social science students this should be based in the science/technology disciplines.

Representative Technology Courses:

CBE 260/EGR 260 – Ethics and Technology: Engineering in the Real World
CEE 102a/b/EGR 102a/b/MAE 102a/b – Engineering in the Modern World
ENV 360* – Biotech Plants and Animals: Frankenfood or Important Innovations?
MAE 228/EGR 228/CBE 228 – Energy Solutions for the Next Century
MAE 244*/EGR 244 – Introduction to Biomedical Innovation and Global Health
MAE 445/EGR 445 – Entrepreneurial Engineering
MOL 205 – Genes, Health, and Society
NEU 259A/B – Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
WWS 353/MAE/AST 353 – Science and Global Security: From Nuclear Weapons to Cyberwarefare

Representative Societal Courses:

EGR 201 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship
EGR 491/ELE 491
– High-Tech Entrepreneurship
EGR 492* – Radical Innovation in Global Markets
HIS 292 – Science in the Modern World
HIS 398 – Technologies and Their Societies: Historical Perspectives
NES 266*/ENV 266 – Oil, Energy and The Middle East
SOC 356* – Sociology of Science (one time course – spring 2013)

*Indicates the course may not always be offered.