Alira Infrared Biosensing

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Alira Infrared Biosensing provides highly sensitive, robust, and noninvasive sensors to measure a multitude of important molecules in any phase of matter. To engineer our world to be a better place to live, we must understand what we are engineering, and to understand first must observe. At Alira, we’re taking this to a new level with MIRI, our mid-infrared eye. What sets MIRI apart from similar devices is that MIRI is versatile, fast, and convenient. The MIRI records over a thousand data points per second, has no moving parts, requires no calibration, and needs no special training. It takes mid-infrared fingerprints of various molecules and combines that with cutting-edge data processing algorithms providing you with a complete picture of the molecules in your material right on the production floor.

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    Nsomma Alilonu '21

    Nsomma Alilonu is a freshman at Princeton University studying Computer Science and pre-medicine. She has been juggling between interests in Computer Science and medicine, both interning at Systems Imagination, a computational biology company interested in optimizing cancer data, and spending time at HonorHealth Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona, where she shadowed a general practitioner and engaged in volunteer work, directing visitors to different parts of the hospital including the emergency room in dangerous situations. Nsomma believes that medicine and technology have become inseparable, thus the reason for the unusual choice in major as a pre-med student. She hopes that by participating in this eLab she can get more hands-on experience applying technology to the life sciences and greater develop the skills of collaboration and innovation that are so necessary to succeed in the world today.

    Program: 2018 eLab Summer Accelerator

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    Noah Apthorpe GS3

    I am a third-year Ph.D. student in the computer science department. I am interested in applying machine learning to help scientists analyze complex data, including Internet traffic and neuroscience microscopy images. My primary research involves identifying and correcting network privacy vulnerabilities of consumer Internet of Things devices. I have also worked with teams at Princeton and Google on techniques to automatically label neurons in electron and fluorescence microscopy data. 

    Program: 2018 eLab Summer Accelerator

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    Yasin Kaya GS4

    Yasin is a fourth year graduate student in electrical engineering department working with Professor Claire Gmachl to develop next generation mid-infrared detectors which will improve spectroscopy and imaging. Yasin first discovered his passion for physics in high school while preparing for the international physics olympiads (IPHO). Once beginning his studies at Bilkent University in Turkey he was introduced to applied science and graduated from the Electrical and Electronics Engineering in 2014. After graduating, he joined Princeton University to pursue his PhD in optics. Having experiences in both fundamental science and engineering, he is now motivated to use his expertise to bring novel technologies developed in lab such as glucose sensor to the average consumer.

    Program: 2018 eLab Summer Accelerator

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    Kalil Shaw '21

    Kalil Shaw is a freshman at Princeton University, studying electrical engineering with a concentration in biomedical engineering and a certificate in neuroscience. Kal brings to Princeton a record of exceptional leadership and community building experiences. He developed his passion for creating devices in high school building a pressure-sensored floormat designed to alarm caregivers when patients wander away. In addition, as the founder of Minds on Math, a Canadian based STEM student mentoring program, Kal continues to promote STEM disciplines as a career option and provides mentor based learning for children in underprivileged communities. As an active member of the Princeton Engineers Without Borders Kenya Program, the Princeton Neuroscience Network and the National Society of Black Engineers, Kal is passionate about bridging the disciplines of engineering and medicine to discover innovative and sustainable methods to enhance the medical industry through developed medical devices and systems.

    Program: 2018 eLab Summer Accelerator

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    Alexandra Werth GS4

    Alexandra Werth is currently a fourth-year graduate student at Princeton University studying electrical engineering. She attended Swarthmore College, a small liberal arts college outside of Philadelphia, where she received dual degrees in general Engineering and Physics in 2014. After graduating, Alex returned to her hometown of Princeton for graduate school. Over the past four years Alex has been working as part of Claire Gmachl’s lab developing a noninvasive glucose sensor using mid-infrared laser spectroscopy. She is excited to see this technology evolve from graduate work to a marketable product. Alex also is passionate about science education, particularly regarding improvements in science education to increase diversity in STEM fields. She is a member the Women in STEM Leadership Council and a founding member and the current president of the Princeton Optical Society of America Chapter.

    Program: 2018 eLab Summer Accelerator